Selling and failing: an attempt to get my novel into a Japanese bookstore

Taking a chance in Japan (日本語でも)

(The following is from my personal journal)

Made an attempt to sell the Japanese version of Cereus & Limnic directly to a Japanese bookstore today. It was an old bookstore called Books Jinon in Ginowan City.

The drive was in the heat of the afternoon. Hot. Sun cooked my arm as I dangled it out the window for a baking breeze.

Thirty minutes or so later I made it. Before I entered, I rehearsed a sample dialogue in Japanese for selling my book to a store with Claude AI. Even though I didn’t use the exact script, it was helpful to have a reference for how the conversation might play out. (First time for such a use.)

Then it was time to enter. I’ve mentioned that I wrote and published a book to a major Japanese bookstore in the past. The Japanese attendant laughed at me.

That taught me I needed proof when talking about my book over here.

Turns out slamming down a box of books with your name on it is pretty convincing.

As soon as the older store clerk saw me, I could tell she wanted to wave me out. I persisted.

In fluent Japanese, I told her I was a local author and wanted to sell the books I wrote.

Something happens when you speak a language well to an unsuspecting recipient. It’s a controlled bewilderment bordering on shock. I’ve seen it many times and I never get tired of it. Just by sequencing the language reasonably well, suddenly it’s them who are somehow made uncomfortable by this scenario that seems so odd, you’d think they saw a unicorn prancing down the street.

The woman had this reaction initially. It was a good sign when I told her the books were in Japanese and she asked to see them.

Step one complete.

She thumbed through it then said 厳しい which was a bad signal.

Kibishii, means “strict” or “harsh.” But in colloquial Japanese, it carries the nuance of a something that is difficult to do and probably won’t happen. The next question was why?

The thumbing through lasted for at least 30 seconds (I think she read something she thought was interesting). Then she asked another good sign question:

“どこの国ですか?”

Ah, now we’re getting somewhere, I thought. This translates to “Where’s country?” (technically).

But in casual Japanese it means: “What country are you from?”

Makes sense to ask. After all a non-Japanese face with the skill and patience to self-translate an entire novel into Japanese, then have the confidence to converse with you to sell it is a very rare thing. I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s the first time she encountered it in all her years. I’d be curious about the person too.

I told I was from America. Then she gave me the final verdict. They only accept old Japanese books.

And not just any Japanese books. These were mostly ancient Japanese records and novels. The smell of mold mashed pages was replete. The shelves were shades of dust wrapped times. In other words it was a living archive. Probably one of the few remaining on island. My book would be a splash of color to bright among those stories stacks. Books often age like wine and mine wasn’t ripe enough.

As a novelist, rejection is routine. But this one was different. The way she caressed the cover upon providing the “no” was telling.

There was a longing there. It was a gesture of care from a person who’s likely spent a great portion of her life with word-filled pages in front of her. Her gaze at the glossy sheen of the cover had a mother’s gleam. There was desire there. What had this foreigner written? Was it any good? If only it were more crinkled with that smell that comes from the attacks of age, humidity, and human hands…

But that wasn’t the case. After a blink, the spell was broken. She handed my book back, then I lifted the box and left.

日本語で

Understood. I'll translate the entry in segments, starting from the beginning. Here's the first segment:

今日、日本の書店に直接『ケレウスとリムニック』の日本語版を売り込もうとした。宜野湾市にある『Books Jinon』という古い書店だった。

運転は真昼の暑さの中で行った。暑かった。窓から腕を出すと、焼けるような風に当たりながら、太陽に腕を焼かれた。

30分ほどして到着した。入店する前に、ClaudeAIを使って、書店に本を売り込むための日本語のサンプル対話を練習した。実際にはそのスクリプトを使わなかったが、会話がどのように展開するかの参考になって役立った。(このような使い方は初めてだった。)

そして、入店の時が来た。過去に大手の日本の書店で自分が本を書いて出版したと言ったことがある。日本人の店員に笑われた。

これで、日本では自分の本について話すときには証拠が必要だと学んだ。

自分の名前が入った本の箱を置くのは、かなり説得力があることがわかった。

年配の店員さんが私を見るなり、追い返そうとしているのがわかった。私は諦めなかった。

流暢な日本語で、地元の作家であり、自分が書いた本を売りたいと伝えた。

予想していない相手に上手に言語を話すと、何かが起こる。それは、驚きと戸惑いの境界線にある反応だ。何度も見てきたが、飽きることはない。ただ言葉を適切に並べるだけで、突然、相手が不快な思いをするような、ユニコーンが通りを歩いているのを見たかのような奇妙な状況になる。

最初、その女性はこのような反応を示した。本が日本語だと伝え、彼女が見たいと言ったのは良い兆候だった。

第一段階完了。

彼女は本をぱらぱらとめくり、その後「厳しい」と言った。これは悪い兆候だった。

「厳しい」は「strict」や「harsh」という意味だ。でも、日常会話の日本語では、実現が難しく、おそらく起こらないだろうというニュアンスを含んでいる。次の質問は「なぜ?」だった。

ぱらぱらとめくる様子は少なくとも30秒は続いた(何か面白いと思ったところを読んでいたように思う)。そして、彼女はもう一つ良い兆候の質問をした。

「どこの国ですか?」

ああ、これで話が進んできたな、と思った。これは文字通りには「Which country?」と訳される。

しかし、カジュアルな日本語では「あなたはどこの国の出身ですか?」という意味だ。

それを聞くのは当然だ。結局のところ、日本人ではない顔をした人間が、小説全体を日本語に自ら翻訳する技術と忍耐力を持ち、さらにそれを売り込む自信を持って会話をするというのは非常に珍しいことだ。彼女の長年の経験の中で、初めての出来事だったとしても驚きはしない。私もその人物について興味を持つだろう。

アメリカ出身だと伝えた。そして彼女は最終的な判断を下した。彼らは古い日本の本しか受け付けていないという。

そして、ただの古い日本の本ではない。これらはほとんどが古代の日本の記録や小説だった。カビの生えたページの匂いが充満していた。

棚には時代を経た埃まみれの本が並んでいた。言い換えれば、それは生きたアーカイブだった。おそらく島に残っている数少ないもののうちの一つだろう。私の本は、それらの物語の山の中では明るすぎる色彩の一滴になってしまうだろう。本はしばしばワインのように熟成するが、私の本はまだ熟していなかった。

小説家として、拒否されることは日常茶飯事だ。しかし、今回は違った。彼女が「ノー」と言いながら表紙を優しく撫でた仕草が物語っていた。

そこには憧れがあった。それは、おそらく人生の大部分を言葉で満ちたページの前で過ごしてきた人の、思いやりのある仕草だった。

光沢のある表紙を見つめる彼女の目には、母親のような輝きがあった。そこには欲望があった。

この外国人は何を書いたのだろう?良い内容なのだろうか?もしこれが、年月と湿気と人の手によってもっとしわくちゃになり、あの独特の匂いがしていたら...

しかし、そうではなかった。瞬きの後、魔法は解けた。彼女は私の本を返し、私は箱を持ち上げて店を出た。

Get previews of original stories and tutorials to write, create, and profit from original stories

No spam, no sharing to third party. Only you and me.

Member discussion